OpenSea Announces Bulk Transfers!

We’re excited to announce bulk transfers! If you’ve got a whole bunch of assets that you need to send all at once, we now offer a convenient mechanism for it.

While the gas costs for transferring the items in bulk will be equal to the sum cost of all the individual transactions and the maximum number of items that transferrable in a single transaction is around 100, we expect bulk transfer to be a powerful time saving tool. When you’re just doing digital chores, the fewer clicks, the better!

How to bulk transfer, a user guide

Bulk transferring is easy! Here’s a quick walk-through:

1. Select your items

First, open the account menu by clicking “My Account”, then select “Gift Multiple Items”. Then add each item that you want to include in the transfer.

2. Set a recipient

Once you’ve selected the items, scroll down to the bottom of the page to enter a recipient address. Then click the “send” button.

3. Approve access

If you haven’t approved access to your items, you’ll need to do that as a preliminary step. Don’t worry, we’ll walk you through the process and you’ll only have to do this once!

4. Send the items!

Once the transactions approving the assets have been confirmed, you’ll be prompted to initiate the actual transfer. This transaction will likely have a higher gas cost, especially if you’re transferring lots of assets, but these are just network fees. OpenSea offers this utility for free. Click to confirm, then when the final transaction is mined, the transfer is complete!

Why we’re excited

Bulk transfers make it easier for NFTs to find their best home; when it’s quicker to transfer assets, they’re more likely to end up in the place where they’re most valued. Consider using bulk transfers for setting up friends with a winning team of Axies, transferring batches of BlockchainCuties between your sibling accounts, or transitioning your CryptoCrystals from your main MetaMask address to a hosted wallet like the Coinbase Wallet.

What other uses do you have for bulk transfers? What other features would you like to see on OpenSea? Let us know on Discord, message us on reddit, or tweet at us. Your input is priceless and we’re always happy to chat!

To stay up to date on more things OpenSea, sign up for our newsletter or follow us on Medium.


Interview: Phil from CryptoGameTalk, Part Two

I joined Phil from the CryptoGameTalk Discord server for a talk about crypto gaming, community building, and NFTs. In this part, we talk about scams, gambling, and competing against bots. But stayed tuned for Part Three, where we get into the controversial stuff.

Phil’s humble demeanor is more consistent with his roots (Pennsylvania) than with his demographic (late 20s) or the scale of his earnings as a gamer (substantial). He was one of the earliest adopters in crypto gaming and he continues to be one of the most dedicated explorers of the space.

CryptoGameTalk is a server that hosts an ongoing, in-depth discussion of dapps. Its focus, as the name suggests, is crypto games, but the conversation reaches related topics including on chain gambling, dapp development, and the Ethereum toolchain. Since its inception in early January 2018, the server has grown to 6273 users.

You can follow our conversation across this three part series.

Continued from Part One

Dan: Did you play Fomo3D at all?

Phil: I didn’t. I didn’t get in the first round, anyways. I was kind of hesitant. I regret that now. I got in on some of the subsequent rounds, the short versions, once I understood the mechanics a bit more. I feel that legitimate Ethereum developers play applications like that off as a cancer on the ecosystem. They say, “this isn’t a good application, it’s just a Ponzi or a pyramid.”

There are people who believe that category ends up hurting the space as a whole, but I’m not sure that I’m one of them. It’s interesting how there’s a community of people who find enjoyment in those types of things. Adoption of those applications is driven by the same impulse that makes people gamble. Fomo3D is just a contract, in code, with a given set of rules. I think that there is a place for that type of stuff. But at the same time, users need to be more informed of the risks of the legitimate offerings and aware of the scams.

In the scene, the word “scam” gets thrown around a lot. It’s gotten to the point where it’s lost connection to what the word actually means. To me, a scam is not just a low value application. A scam is a dishonest offering dressed as a legitimate offering, maybe an unverified contract that allows the dev to withdraw all the Ether and run. It doesn’t provide anything. It’s deceptive in some way. Whereas, with some of these gambling type of contracts, it’s more complicated. Users are aware that they could lose their Ether. But they think that it’s a good bet and they try their luck.

It’s weird how some people are really standoffish about this stuff. We might see a surge of people being more assertive about protecting these games, saying, “It’s not just a developer scamming users. People are willingly engaging and they are finding some sense of enjoyment from participating.”

I don’t think it’s necessarily a bad thing, you know? Predatory, opportunistic developers and blatant scams are bad, of course. But, look at what happens in the real world, this is nothing new. People want to gamble their money. These games just provide a new layer. It’s just a new element in an existing framework. But it can be really confusing to some people.

I have a lot of mixed feelings about it, but I think there’s a place for it. The global Ethereum community should make an effort to acknowledge that this is a part of the ecosystem now, instead of just trying to push it away, saying, “This doesn’t belong. We don’t want this here.” Because it’s always going to be there, just by the nature of the technology. There’s always going to be communities of people who want to participate in those types of things. We need to work on building a healthier relationship with the gambling facet of our ecosystem. Spreading knowledge will help a that. Just being more informed about the risks involved goes a long way. It’s really complicated.

Dan: Yeah, it is. And I think you’re right about the assertion that information is the antidote to those evils, to the extent that they are evils. The crypto space lends itself to voluntaryism, right? It attracts people who want to live in a world where people aren’t protected from themselves. I’m Libertarian enough to be comfortable with adults deciding to gamble.

There are definitely some political issues that touch our world. Did the politics of cryptocurrency draw you in at all?

Phil: I mean, yeah in a sense. I’m definitely more leftist or libertarian. I’m kind of a hippie type, honestly. But there are some seriously troubling uncertainties. What happens if Proof of Weak Hands ends up getting ridiculously massive, out of control? How would the government intervene? It’s a complicated thing to not have an emergency brake on it. Developers need more legal advice. They need to understand the ramifications for themselves and for their users. Obviously, it won’t be a “one glove fits all” scenario. It’s an international community, after all.

But right now, governments just don’t care about this small dapp culture. I can’t see it being a priority in its current form. We just don’t register on their radar, and we’ve got cover from the ICO world and the large scale crypto scams. But I think that as time goes by, we’ll see situations where the law does step in. As more precedent is set, we’ll have more certainty about the contours of what’s acceptable and what’s not.

Dan: I’m not convinced that the government is going to be able to catch up. The technology is advancing so rapidly and adoption is still so fast, while it’s not what it was during the crazy bull run, that the chances of the legislature catching up with this movement in time to meaningfully regulate it are slim. It’ll require some new legislative paradigm, or else we really are going to have a financial system, a global settlement layer, that exists more or less outside the control of national governments. It’s complicated well beyond what you and I are qualified to give definitive judgments on, but it is one of the things that’s exciting about the space to me.

Phil: Definitely. There’s a lot of unexplored territory around here. You never know exactly how things are going to play out and crypto moves at super speed. It’s crazy to see all these things happening so fast.

Dan: All right, we’ve reached a pretty high level of generality and I’m starting to feel way out of my depth. Let’s get down into the nitty-gritty of a game. What have you played today?

Phil: I think I may have withdrawn from this Ethergarden game. It was kind of a dumb idea to get into it.

Dan: What’s Ethergarden?

Phil: It’s one of those shrimp-like games. I don’t know if you’re familiar with them. Ether Shrimps came out a while back and then there were a bunch of clones of it. It had a good UI, this Ethergarden thing. I think you have to keep like converting pumpkins to renew your harvest or something in order to keep up with your own investments. I wasn’t totally following it. I wouldn’t recommend that anyone gets into something like that.

Dan: I’m not familiar with the shrimp games. I don’t know that format. Is it a passive thing, kind of like Goo?

Phil: Sort of. It was kind of an idle game. You’d buy eggs, and then over time, you get shrimp. And then you can breed them and convert them to eggs. It ended up really heavily botted. Somebody scripting this stuff would have a big advantage over somebody manually playing. And I think that’s why it didn’t catch on that much after the bots took over.

Dan: Any game with real money at stake that can be botted is eventually going to be less fun for humans to play manually. I’ve got two questions here. A) is the meta-game of writing bots a meaningful game, in the traditional sense? And B) have bots been a healthy or unhealthy thing for the space?

Phil: Well, to answer A): yes. Definitely. B) Overall, it’s healthy. It’s just a feature of games on the blockchain. And you can’t really prevent it, anyways.

An interesting thing that FairDapp has done is release a public, open source bot for people who want to use it in the game. They knew the game would be botted and figured that botting would benefit their ecosystem. I think that’s an interesting concept of its own: building games with the knowledge that they can be botted and giving users access to the useful bots. That’s a really new and innovative, next-level type of thing.

Dan: Including a bot in the shrinkwrap as part of the game: that’s definitely new and radical. Would you go into FairDapp a little bit deeper?

Phil: There’s a P3D style exchange, which is fed certain amounts from the other games. He started with other games, it wasn’t P3D at all. It was kind of it was kind of a hot potato concept, a hot potato / Fomo hybrid where there’s these stages and these quotas to be filled. A certain amount that players put into each stage goes to a jackpot and a certain amount is given to players in the previous stages. If the quota fills before this timer goes down, then the game goes into its next stage, with a higher target. But if it doesn’t, the people who had put their Ether in at that final stage share the jackpot when the timer runs out.

It got pretty interesting, honestly. People continually played it. It’s hard to build a game that keeps players interested. People loved chasing that jackpot. But then at the end, they would be sniped by a lot of people, and that rush would push the game over into the next round.

He launched something else, which is kind of like a bank simulator, which was a little more complicated. It had some limitations, but he’s always pushing boundaries. He’s making games that draw on the gambling dapp concepts that have succeeded in the past, but always with these novel twists on them. He made an exchange type of thing for his future games to feed into.

That’s getting big: devs create a P3D style center, and then users can hold on to it and benefit from profits or commissions from the other games. It’s really interesting to see. At first, when Proof of Weak Hands was released, it just stood on its own. But now people are integrating other concepts and creating a broader ecosystem. That’s pretty cool. So I’m excited to see what’s next for FairDapp.

Dan: It’s a form of interoperability that’s unique to this space. Devin asserts that interoperability is the real feature of the space, above and beyond everything else. What other games do a good job of interacting with another dapp? What’s the most interesting relationship between dapps right now?

Phil: Surprisingly, there isn’t much. Everyone talks about interoperability, but at end of the day, devs believe there’s more money in sticking to their own platform, instead of building off someone else’s. CryptoKitties has the KittyVerse community, which is kind of cool. I saw Kitty Fights or something was coming soon. I remember looking into that. That was pretty cool.

But I think there is room to explore interoperability on a larger scale and benefit from being exposed to various different communities. I have actually had an idea of something of that sort that I’m still on the fence with. But I don’t want anyone to steal it from me.

Dan: Oh, what a cruel tease! How brutal. All right. Fair enough. No pressure. Did you play Magic: The Gathering? What was your gaming background like?

Phil: I did play Magic: The Gathering. I played a lot of Yu-gi-oh! when I was younger, and Pokemon. I kind of wished that I kept my good cards. I think I sold my Charizard for around 20 dollars at a yard sale. Now, I look at the prices and they’re worth so much more.

Dan: I feel that way about the early, low ID, cryptocollectibles like low ID CryptoKitties. I think we’ll look back through our transactions someday and we’ll see transactions that make us groan.

Phil: That’s what I’m hoping for. Back in the day, I made an R script to more easily visualize the cats of ID less than 10,000. I would buy them out a certain threshold and then I would list them. A lot of them sold for a decent profit. I would snap up anything for less than 0.01ETH and then list them. I called them “collectors cat” and I’d list them for 0.1ETH if they were just completely random. Some of the Gen 0s, I’d list for much more.

There just aren’t many cheap cats below 10,000 anymore. They’ve mostly been snatched up or maybe users just forgot about them. Some of the early players just aren’t active anymore. I do believe that the prices for low ID cats will increase.

That’s that’s the reason why I bought a founder cat last week or so. I saw one that was 29 Ether and I decided that it would be cool to have one of those. I saw that the floor seemed to be rising on founders and I pulled the trigger. I don’t know if I’ll try and flip it for a profit or just hold on to it for a long time. CryptoKitties will always be that first big name dapp. That really can’t be changed now. They’ve solidified themselves in history. I think that alone will ensure that there is some persistent value for those cats.

Dan: Absolutely. There can only be one authentic original, and CryptoKitties is it. Other than the founder cat, what long term plays have you made? It sounds like you do well on week-to-week plays, but what are you hoarding? What are you keeping for the long term?

Phil: Well, for a lot of the stuff I’m keeping long term, it’s mostly just because there is no market for them anymore. Now my celebrities — my Trump card, that’s stuck there. I mean it is cool. I can look back on it and you know it’s a story. But I think I spent — this was when Ether was like a thousand each — I bought it at a discount for like 85 Ether and ended up getting stuck with it. So, now I’m just stuck. I’m just holding that now. Maybe someday it’ll be something, but I don’t know, maybe not.

I usually just grab things and sometimes I forget about them. Then once I hear about the game again, it’s like, “Oh yeah, I remember, I had some of those.” I don’t have any Etheremon. I think I sold them. I probably should have kept some. But their market opened up and I was able to sell them for a decent price.

Sometimes I go on OpenSea and just get things that look interesting. There’s this HiPrecious collection and I saw the zero token, a Suma Tiger. I decided to just grab that because it looked cheap and interesting and it was the zero token. I don’t know if it has any future or anything, but it seemed cool at the time.

Dan: My impulse purchases on OpenSea are usually art. If I can find a Known Origin piece that’s relatively cheap and looks interesting, I’ll get one. Are you interested in crypto art at all?

Phil: At the end of the day I think the art is just the frontend manifestation. It’s good that it’s all stored by marketplaces like OpenSea, so that visual representation can live on beyond the original developer support. But for me, it’s hit or miss. I usually want to get some other type of value from it, beyond just art.

Dan: Does it matter to you whether the visual asset that corresponds to a token is stored on IPFS or just on some third party servers? Is it enough that OpenSea also hosts those images, or do you want to see some sort of more robust, on chain support for the visual assets? Or is it just purely about the token for you?

Phil: It would be cool if there were some way to own the art associated with each token. I know people have talked about that regarding CryptoKitties, how technically the art is owned by CryptoKitties.

I think that in the future, people will be able to pull that off a little better. It definitely helps to have OpenSea backing up the images. That way, I can at least look at and admire my CryptoCelebrities.

Continued in Part Three


Trade Dyverse Kydys on OpenSea!

We’re excited to announce that Dyverse Kydys are now tradeable on OpenSea!

According to Dyverse cofounder Rudy Lee,

We launched the Dyverse, a blockchain-based marketplace for AR characters called Kydys. What’s unique about these characters is that you can use them in our AR app Kydy (which we also launched on PH last year!) to create videos that you can share on any social media platform.

We love building AR products, and we’re stoked to bring AR experiences to the blockchain and gaming worlds. Plus, if you own a Kydy, no one else can use it or buy it (unless you sell it) so your social media content or in-game character will be literally one-of-a-kind!

NFTs in augmented reality? It’s a delightful alphabet soup of high! Check out the selection on OpenSea here.

Why list your Kydys on OpenSea?

Keep your items in your wallet while they’re on sale

You can create an auction for a Kydy but keep it in your own wallet while it’s on sale. That way, you can still summon your Kydy in AR while it’s on the market! You can learn more about our auction feature here.

List Kydys without paying gas

Once you’ve set up your OpenSea account, you can list your Dyverse without paying gas or waiting for confirmations from the blockchain. When you list a Kydy, you just sign the listing with MetaMask. When the item is purchased, the buyer submits a transaction, and the deal is done.

Accept bids for your Kydys

Not sure how to price your Kydys? You don’t have to! Other users can bid on a Kydy (even if it’s not on sale!) without any action from its owner. The owner can immediately fulfill these bids, receiving WETH in exchange for the Kydy.

Sell Kydys by the bundle

Sellers on OpenSea can sell multiple assets in one transaction. If you’ve got a load of surplus Dyverse assets, you can group them into a single listing for a single price. Plus, it’s gasless! Just put together the bundle listing and sign it with MetaMask. For more details, check out our Medium post.

Get more exposure

Thousands of users browse OpenSea for all sorts of game items, collectibles, digital artwork, and more. By listing your Kydy alongside other collectibles, you gain a ton of exposure.

Interested in joining the Dyverse discussion? Check out their Discord server. Or to see what else is brewing in the world of NFTs, join us over at the OpenSea Discord server.


Trade Dragonereum Assets on OpenSea!

We’re excited to announce that Dragonereum assets (both Eggs and Dragons) are now tradeable on OpenSea!

Dragonereum differentiates itself from its peers on the strength of its complex breeding, PvP fighting, training, and trading mechanics. And players are really getting into it, even finding interesting exploits! But don’t worry, the Dragonereum team is staying on top of things.

Be sure to read their article on Gold, their in-game currency, to get a sense of the game’s internal economy. Check out the selection of Dragons and Eggs on OpenSea for the rest!

Why list your Dragon on OpenSea?

Keep your items in your wallet while they’re on sale

You can create an auction for n Dragon but keep it in your own wallet while it’s on sale. That way, you can still breed and battle your Dragon while it’s on the market! You can learn more about this feature here.

List Dragons without paying gas

Once you’ve set up your OpenSea account, you can list your Dragonereum assets without paying gas or waiting for confirmations from the blockchain. When you list a Dragon, you just sign the listing with MetaMask. When the item is purchased, the buyer submits a transaction, and the deal is done.

Accept bids for your Dragons

Not sure how to price your Dragonereum assets? You don’t have to! Other users can bid on a Dragon (even if it’s not on sale!) without any action from its owner. The owner can immediately fulfill these bids, receiving WETH in exchange for the Dragon.

Sell Dragons by the bundle

Sellers on OpenSea can sell multiple assets in one transaction. You could even sell a whole family of Dragons! Or if you’ve got a load of surplus Dragons and Eggs, you can group them into a single listing for a single price. Plus, it’s gasless! Just put together the bundle listing and sign it with MetaMask. For more details, check out our Medium post.

Get more exposure

Thousands of users browse OpenSea for all sorts of game items, collectibles, digital artwork, and more. By listing your Dragons and Eggs alongside other collectibles, you gain a ton of exposure.

Interested in joining the Dragonereum discussion? Check out their Discord server. Or to see what else is brewing in the world of NFTs, join us over at the OpenSea Discord server.


Gitcoin Kudos are now tradeable on OpenSea

We’re excited to announce that Gitcoin Kudos are now tradeable on OpenSea. Check out the bargain-priced Kudos the Gitcoin team are selling with us! You’ll find something for the shills, the superstars, and even the party people in your life. Stick around to learn why sending a coworker a Kudos is more than just airdropping an NFT!

Gitcoin is a model project in the Ethereum community: they’re solving a real problem, they attract real users, and they kept their heads through the ICO mania (plus, we can testify: they’re absolute collaboration machines). Gitcoin provides low-overhead infrastructure for matching up people who have money and need software with people who have skills and need money. In other words, Gitcoin helps funders find developers.

Bounties provide Gitcoin’s primary mechanism for completing this matchmaking duty. A funder creates specifications for a feature they need built and promises a reward for its completion. Bounty hunters select tasks from the list of available bounties, complete the work, and get paid in Ethereum.

But a clean, transactional contract like a paid bounty isn’t all the joy of contributing to software projects. Software engineers also enjoy soft benefits, like getting casual props from a supervisor, feeling the prestige of being known among a peer group as a subject matter expert, or receiving a handwritten thank you note after helping a coworker out of a tight spot.

Gitcoin rolled out Kudos, nonfungible tokens of appreciation, to fill this gap. To paraphrase Kevin Owocki, “Kudos are the greeting card of the blockchain era.”

While bounties offer monetary value, Kudos derive their value and meaning from the very act of being sent as a reward for excellence. Bounties remain the core of Gitcoin’s functionality. But Kudos represent the first addition to a suite of products, designed to grow and sustain the open source software world, that Gitcoin plans on releasing in the next few years.

OpenSea + Gitcoin Connect

We get it, we love it, and we had to have a piece of it for our own. So, we commissioned a “Salty Dog” Kudos and we’re psyched to start sending them to the OpenSea community!

For the most part, Kudos operate just like the ERC-721s you know and love. But there’s an extra kicker: owners of Gen0 Kudos earn 90% of the cloning fee each time a Gitcoin user clones a Kudos. Under normal circumstances, the Gen0 version of a token is held by the artist who created the image for it. But if you can get your hands on one, it’ll throw off revenue!

An Interview with Gitcoin’s Founder Kevin Owocki

We had the privilege of hosting the self-described Chief Janitor of Gitcoin, Kevin Owocki, for a chat about Kudos, bounties, and the perks of building on the blockchain in Colorado.

Dan: Where did the Kudos idea originate from?

Kevin: The products that you ship are one result of a career in software development, but the relationships that you build are another sort of really important output. I’ve worked at four or five different startups and I keep in touch with all the engineers I’ve worked with at those different places.

I have these really fond memories of being in the trenches with them, working really hard, and releasing great products. And for each person I can look back and think, “This person is really good at X and this person is really good at Y.” When I worked on site with people, we would go out and have beers or get dinner to celebrate our successes. But when you’re in a distributed team, you can do that as much. That’s sort of thread number one.

Number two is that open source software has historically been very intrinsically motivated and Gitcoin pulled it over toward being extrinsically motivated with rewards like bounties. By introducing a product that allows members of our network to show appreciation for each other and engage in more robust networking with each other, we felt like we were righting the ship and pulling it back towards the historical intrinsic motivations of open source software. So, I would say that those are sort of the two threads that informed the introduction of Kudos.

And Kudos is not just a double sided market with the sender and the receiver. It’s a triple sided market, where there’s an artist who’s selling to the sender, who then sends to the receiver, right? CryptoKitties are all procedurally generated and that allows you to operate without leaning as heavily on that artist leg in the tripod. Maybe it’s that I’m just not a talented enough procedurally generated artwork programmer or maybe it was a considered choice, but we designed Kudos in such a way that you need to have that actor that sells the artwork. We’re not procedurally generating them.

Who earns money when a new Kudos is created?

When a new Kudos is created, the ETH sent during that minting process is directly sent to the illustrator who created the Kudos artwork…”

And by providing a cryptoeconomic incentive for the artist to produce more artwork for the community, you’re actually structuring the product such that there’s going to be more inventory on the Kudos platform over time. The cloning mechanism is the way that the artists are going to make their money on the Gitcoin Kudos marketplace. It’s going to help create us more inventory, because as artists make money off of selling their Kudos, then they’ll hopefully tell their friends and attract more artists. That’s the theory, at least. We’ve only been launched for a few weeks!

Dan: How are holders of kudos going to be able to meaningfully convey the contents their collection to an interested audience?

Kevin: On each Gitcoin profile, there’s a bunch of stats about how many bounties the user has completed and what they’ve been up to on the platform. But they’ve got this ‘My Kudos’ section where you can flip a Kudos around and see who sent it.

Basically, I think a Kudos is an attestation of someone’s reputation and it’s got three parts. It’s got a sender, a receiver and the Kudos in the context in between the sender and receiver. And that’s what sort of gives it value. Once a kudos is sent to someone, it’s in this sort of gallery on their profile. And we’re going to experiment with ways that you can embed your gallery on different sites, like on your resumé, but haven’t gotten there yet.

Dan: Will I be able to see Kudos on GitHub?

Kevin: Yeah, we’ve got to GitHub issue out for that. I should probably put a bounty on that so that someone builds it!

Dan: Could you talk a little bit about getting funders up to speed and what the most common issues in the Gitcoin workflow?

Kevin: The way I like to explain it goes like this: if you hire an Uber driver, you have pretty clear expectations for what you want out of them. You want them to take you from A to B. You want them to do it safely and quickly — and hopefully they’re not a creep. You’ll give them five stars if that happens. The problem with software development is that the task that I tell you to do, let’s call it task ‘X’, you might hear that as ‘X′’ and deliver ‘X′’. Then I see it and I’m like, “Oh, well, I really wanted ‘X′1.’” Software development is very abstract as compared to something like an Uber ride.

There’s this progressive elaboration of scope when it comes to software development. Encouraging people to really think through what they want, why they want it, what it’s going to look like, and how many iterations there will be, that’s basically teaching people product management. And so far, we’ve put out a series of Medium posts about how to price your bounty, how to specify your bounty, and how your report should be documented. Maybe 10 percent of our funders will look through all that documentation before they fund their first bounty and maybe 80 percent of them will just YOLO their way into their first bounty.

Just teaching funders how to be good project managers is something that we have to take on because, if you have a bad experience with a product, it doesn’t matter if it’s the result of some funder being a bad project manager. It’s still a brand dilution for Gitcoin. So, we’re trying to take responsibility for the quality of the scope and the pricing of the bounties on the platform. It’s a long term investment in our community, but I think it’s going to really pay off because these are core skills of working in the digital economy and I think it’s a public service to be teaching them to people.

Dan: Is Gitcoin Gold a Band-Aid solution to carry you over to the days when people are better at project management? Or is that a core part of the Gitcoin revenue model?

Kevin: A lot of crypto-rich funders might say, “I don’t want to deal with this. Whatever. You manage our bounties for us.” That’s why Gitcoin Gold is available. I think that you’re going to see periods in which the cost of capital is high. We’re in crypto winter right now, in a bear market. But you’re going to see times when the cost of capital is low and people are more time poor than they’re money poor. Gitcoin Gold is just a way for people who are cash rich and time poor to deal with management of bounties.

We haven’t done any long term projections about how that’s going to look as we train more people to do project management. But my theory is that a certain percentage of people are always just going to pay us to manage their bounties because it’s just easier than figuring it out for themselves.

Dan: The Denver-Boulder orbit is home to a lot of folks building blockchain tech. What is it about Colorado that makes it such fertile ground for blockchain tech?

Kevin: Good question. I’m always happy to talk about this because it’s part of my role as a Colorado community organizer to shill Colorado.

I think that basically, you have people who moved to Colorado because their values included having time in the outdoors and getting out of the rat race. There’s sort of a freethinking, frontier, libertarian kind of mindset out here. I think that that subset of people overlaps heavily with the blockchain developer subset.

Colorado is a community of transplants and because of that, we’ve been really welcoming to people on the west coast and on the east coast that want to come out for events like ETH Denver or Colorado blockchain week. There’s a really good sort of overlap culturally between the blockchain space and Colorado. And also it’s just a great place to be. It shouldn’t be any surprise that blockchain people are coming out here.

But we have a pretty audacious goal of competing with Silicon Valley and with New York for blockchain talent and I hope that it comes to fruition, because it’s amazing to be out here in Colorado.

Dan: I hope I can make it to the next ETHDenver. Thanks for the time and insights!

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Can you think of a colleague that deserves a pat on the back? Give one! Have you been guided by a useful discussion in the comments of a GitHub issue? Thanks all around! What else do you have to be grateful for? Check out the selection of Gitcoin Kudos on OpenSea here for inspiration and make your appreciation known.

Why list your Gitcoin Kudos on OpenSea? Well, first of all, developers need to be able to buy Kudos if they’re going to send them to their task-crushing colleagues. And that means we need sellers! Plus, selling on OpenSea gives you superpowers. Check them out!

Keep your items in your wallet while they’re on sale

You can create an auction for a Kudos but keep it in your own wallet while it’s on sale. Learn more about this feature here.

List Kudos without paying gas

Once you’ve set up your OpenSea account, you can list your Gitcoin Kudos without paying gas or waiting for confirmations from the blockchain. When you list a Kudos, you just sign the listing with MetaMask. When the item is purchased, the buyer submits a transaction, and the deal is done.

Accept bids for your Kudos

Not sure how to price your Gitcoin Kudos? You don’t have to! When someone sees a Kudos that they might want to send to a coworker, they can bid on it (even if it’s not on sale!) without any action from its owner. The owner can immediately fulfill these bids, receiving WETH in exchange for the Kudos.

Sell Kudos by the bundle

Sellers on OpenSea can sell multiple assets in one transaction. You could even sell a full stack pack, so the buyer can reward the whole team for a feature well shipped. Or if you’ve got a load of surplus Gitcoin Kudos all of one type, you can group them into a single listing for a single price. Plus, it’s gasless! Just put together the bundle listing and sign it with MetaMask. For more details, check out our Medium post.

Get more exposure

Thousands of users browse OpenSea for all sorts of game items, collectibles, digital artwork, and more. By listing your Kudos alongside other collectibles, you gain a ton of exposure.

Interested in joining the Gitcoin discussion? Check out the chatter on Slack. For more information on Gitcoin, check out Gitcoin’s website or read through their content on Medium. To see what else is brewing in the world of NFTs, join us over at the OpenSea Discord channel.


OpenSea Announces Zero-Fee Private Auctions!

We’re proud to announce that OpenSea now supports private auctions! Sellers can now give an Ethereum address exclusive rights to fulfill an order. Plus, there’s no fee on private auctions!

The way we see it, this new utility makes OpenSea an even better place to settle the type of deal that gets negotiated on Discord or Telegram.

How to create a private auction, a user guide

Creating a private auction is easy! Here’s a quick walk-through:

1. Click ‘Sell’ on the asset’s page

First, navigate to the asset’s page. Then click ‘Sell’ like you usually would.

2. Toggle the privacy setting to ‘Private’

Click on the toggle in the ‘Privacy’ section.

3. Enter the buyer’s address

Clicking the privacy toggle will give you access to a field where you can specify the address that will have the exclusive right to fulfill the listing.

4. Click ‘Post your listing’ then ‘Sign’

Next, click the ‘Post your listing’ button in the top right corner of the page. You’ll see a MetaMask popup prompting you to sign the listing. Click ‘Sign’ to finalize.

5. Share your link!

Now, you’re ready to share your link with your chosen trading partner. And don’t be afraid to share the link in a public way! To your specified counterparty, the page will appear as normal. But everyone else will see a warning advising them that the asset isn’t available to them.

But don’t worry if you find yourself on the outside of this arrangement looking in, heavy-hearted and eager to buy a privately listed item. You can always make a more tempting offer!

Why we’re excited

Private auctions allow sellers to find buyers through a variety of channels outside the OpenSea ecosystem and then use OpenSea to safely and cheaply settle the deal. Either the whole exchange happens, or none of it does. No escrow agents. No waiting, fingers crossed, hoping that your counterparty will send you the promised payment. We’re especially pleased to offer this feature to the Decentraland community, where private sales are a common part of business.

What other uses do you have for private auctions? What other features would you like to see on OpenSea? Let us know on Discord, message us on reddit, or tweet at us. Your input is priceless and we’re always happy to chat!

To stay up to date on more things OpenSea, sign up for our newsletter or follow us on Medium.


Trade CryptoBeasties on OpenSea!

We’re excited to announce that CryptoBeasties are now tradeable on OpenSea!

According to the CryptoBeasties website,

“In CryptoBeasties, you collect and upgrade cards, and then pit teams of three cards against opponents’ teams in arena battles. Along the way you earn loot and skill points, and use those points to improve your cards.

Each card represents a creature, or ‘Beastie’ (though some of these Beasties are humans). Information about each creature, including its ownership and all its enhancements, is encoded and stored on the blockchain.”

Sounds like fun! Check out the selection on OpenSea here.

Why list your Beastie on OpenSea?

Keep your items in your wallet while they’re on sale

You can create an auction for aBeastie but keep it in your own wallet while it’s on sale. That way, you can still battle your Beastie while it’s on the market! You can learn more about this feature here.

List CryptoBeasties without paying gas

Once you’ve set up your OpenSea account, you can list your CryptoBeasties without paying gas or waiting for confirmations from the blockchain. When you list a Beastie, you just sign the listing with MetaMask. When the item is purchased, the buyer submits a transaction, and the deal is done.

Accept bids for your CryptoBeasties

Not sure how to price your CryptoBeasties? You don’t have to! Other users can bid on a Beastie (even if it’s not on sale!) without any action from its owner. The owner can immediately fulfill these bids, receiving WETH in exchange for the Beastie.

Sell Beasties by the bundle

Sellers on OpenSea can sell multiple assets in one transaction. You could even sell a full winning deck of Beasties! Or if you’ve got a load of surplus CryptoBeasties, you can group them into a single listing for a single price. Plus, it’s gasless! Just put together the bundle listing and sign it with MetaMask. For more details, check out our Medium post.

Get more exposure

Thousands of users browse OpenSea for all sorts of game items, collectibles, digital artwork, and more. By listing your Beastie alongside other collectibles, you gain a ton of exposure.

Want to sell a Beastie on OpenSea?

Then be sure to check out this section of the CryptoBeasties FAQ:

“Before you can finalize a sale on OpenSea, you need to make your card ‘Transferable’. This is a security step, so that cards can’t change ownership while being used during game play.

To make your card Transferable:

From the OpenSea page for your card, click the ‘View on CryptoBeasties’ link. (You can also get to the Card Details page from your My Beasties page). This takes you to a Card Details page on our site, where you can see that specific card. At the bottom of the page is a MAKE TRANSFERABLE button. Click that, pay a little gas, and when the transaction completes, your card will be free to sell or trade.”

Interested in joining the CryptoBeasties discussion? Check out their Discord server. Or to see what else is brewing in the world of NFTs, join us over at the OpenSea Discord server.