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This unique 6-month pinhole camera exposure (solargraph) makes a particularly significant NFT.

NFTs can be compared to the very first images captured on photographic paper (as opposed to film negatives) ie. originally, only one unique copy of every photograph existed (before film negatives allowed endless copies to be made).

With NFTs we've come full circle, and once again images can be truly unique.

This solargraph of the Glasgow Science Centre was taken from across the River Clyde - between the Winter Solstice (21 December 2003, when the Sun was at its lowest position in the sky), and the Summer Solstice (21 June 2004, when the Sun was at its highest position in the sky). Not only is this solargraph unusually bright and colourful for a pinhole camera image, but it's also outstanding in having captured the Sun's tracks reflected on the river. Additionally, it's a one-of-a-kind solargraph because a box-like building now stands to the left of the IMAX. The size of the original image is 3513x1780 pixels at 400 DPI. The winning bid will also receive a framed fine art print and signed Certificate of Authenticity. Find out more about this renowned solargraph at: http://bit.ly/gsc-solar

CryptoGeneral collection image
This collection has no description yet. Contact the owner of this collection about setting it up on OpenSea!
Contract Address0x495f...7b5e
Token ID
Token StandardERC-1155
BlockchainEthereum
MetadataCentralized
Creator Earnings
info
2.5%

The Glasgow Science Centre Solargraph (pinhole camera image)

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The Glasgow Science Centre Solargraph (pinhole camera image)

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visibility
21 views
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    USD Price
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    USD Price
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This unique 6-month pinhole camera exposure (solargraph) makes a particularly significant NFT.

NFTs can be compared to the very first images captured on photographic paper (as opposed to film negatives) ie. originally, only one unique copy of every photograph existed (before film negatives allowed endless copies to be made).

With NFTs we've come full circle, and once again images can be truly unique.

This solargraph of the Glasgow Science Centre was taken from across the River Clyde - between the Winter Solstice (21 December 2003, when the Sun was at its lowest position in the sky), and the Summer Solstice (21 June 2004, when the Sun was at its highest position in the sky). Not only is this solargraph unusually bright and colourful for a pinhole camera image, but it's also outstanding in having captured the Sun's tracks reflected on the river. Additionally, it's a one-of-a-kind solargraph because a box-like building now stands to the left of the IMAX. The size of the original image is 3513x1780 pixels at 400 DPI. The winning bid will also receive a framed fine art print and signed Certificate of Authenticity. Find out more about this renowned solargraph at: http://bit.ly/gsc-solar

CryptoGeneral collection image
This collection has no description yet. Contact the owner of this collection about setting it up on OpenSea!
Contract Address0x495f...7b5e
Token ID
Token StandardERC-1155
BlockchainEthereum
MetadataCentralized
Creator Earnings
info
2.5%
Event
Price
From
To
Date