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For Edith a series of 8 NFTs. My pilgrimage to Plano fell in late September 2018 as summer was becoming fall. The mood of the trees and Fox River shifted with the changing weather and light. A storm passed through, then night enveloped the glow of the Farnsworth House. These photographs are a glimpse of the exquisite solitude I experienced here. What was Edith Farnsworth's experience of her house? Reading her unpublished poems and letters, I discovered an unexpected kinship. These poems are the thoughts of a woman with no distractions. Surrounded by trees, beside a river, Edith is alone, listening to her emotions ebb and flow in concert with her surroundings. Living inside the first glass house was a singular adventure. Edith was unconventional- an unwedded, female physician working in midcentury America. But the narrative of Edith as a woman scorned is fiction. Her close friendship with her architect lasted three years. Mies and Edith discussed philosophy, physics and architecture. She spent time at his studio and was involved with the construction of her house. This was not a failed romance. It did not chart her path. Her collaboration with Mies Van Der Rohe yielded a building she knew would be formative in the history of architecture. My photos consider Edith: .the corner she wrote in, with its expansive views .the windows she fought to be included in the design .the terrace outside the front door, she screened for respite from mosquitos, seasonal heat, and humidity trapped inside .absent curtains, a reminder of the roller shades she installed, not visible from outside .the current volume of Mies' furniture on display, pared down, symbolizing her rejection of his interior design Dr. Edith Farnsworth was a pioneer of life-saving kidney research. She held a degree from The University of Chicago in Literature and Composition. She wrote the first English translation of future Nobel Prize winner, Eugenio Montale’s poems. She was anti-fascist and socialized with influential feminists. She co-created one of the most influential houses in history. I had gone to shoot Mies’s masterpiece, and I found Edith.

These photos of the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois show the simplicity and elegance of Mies Van Der Rohe’s design. The Farnsworth, built in 1951, is one of the most influential houses in the history of architecture. Even Philip Johnson’s glass house was based on its design. Elizabeth Daniels

Elizabeth Daniels is an award-winning photographer based in her native Los Angeles. Her photographs have appeared in; The New York Times, Architectural Digest, Architects Newspaper, LA Times, and Elle magazine, just to name a few. She prefers to work alone, which allows her the opportunity to experience seminal architecture like the Farnsworth House, the Ennis House, and the Salk Institute with undivided, quiet, and intuitive attention. In this way, she can better understand the architect - and her lens can better capture - the details that make a structure special. Her approach to photography and her post production perfectionism have not missed the attention of AIA. Annually, over the past three years, Daniels’ work has won an AIA/APA award for its excellence.
Contract Address0x495f...7b5e
Token ID
Token StandardERC-1155
BlockchainEthereum
MetadataCentralized
Creator Fees10%

For Edith 1

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Sale ends August 20, 2022 at 5:34pm GMT+0 
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For Edith 1

0

visibility
12 views
schedule
Sale ends August 20, 2022 at 5:34pm GMT+0 
Current price
0.1
($106.76)
  • Price
    USD Price
    Expiration
    From
  • Price
    USD Price
    Floor Difference
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For Edith a series of 8 NFTs. My pilgrimage to Plano fell in late September 2018 as summer was becoming fall. The mood of the trees and Fox River shifted with the changing weather and light. A storm passed through, then night enveloped the glow of the Farnsworth House. These photographs are a glimpse of the exquisite solitude I experienced here. What was Edith Farnsworth's experience of her house? Reading her unpublished poems and letters, I discovered an unexpected kinship. These poems are the thoughts of a woman with no distractions. Surrounded by trees, beside a river, Edith is alone, listening to her emotions ebb and flow in concert with her surroundings. Living inside the first glass house was a singular adventure. Edith was unconventional- an unwedded, female physician working in midcentury America. But the narrative of Edith as a woman scorned is fiction. Her close friendship with her architect lasted three years. Mies and Edith discussed philosophy, physics and architecture. She spent time at his studio and was involved with the construction of her house. This was not a failed romance. It did not chart her path. Her collaboration with Mies Van Der Rohe yielded a building she knew would be formative in the history of architecture. My photos consider Edith: .the corner she wrote in, with its expansive views .the windows she fought to be included in the design .the terrace outside the front door, she screened for respite from mosquitos, seasonal heat, and humidity trapped inside .absent curtains, a reminder of the roller shades she installed, not visible from outside .the current volume of Mies' furniture on display, pared down, symbolizing her rejection of his interior design Dr. Edith Farnsworth was a pioneer of life-saving kidney research. She held a degree from The University of Chicago in Literature and Composition. She wrote the first English translation of future Nobel Prize winner, Eugenio Montale’s poems. She was anti-fascist and socialized with influential feminists. She co-created one of the most influential houses in history. I had gone to shoot Mies’s masterpiece, and I found Edith.

These photos of the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois show the simplicity and elegance of Mies Van Der Rohe’s design. The Farnsworth, built in 1951, is one of the most influential houses in the history of architecture. Even Philip Johnson’s glass house was based on its design. Elizabeth Daniels

Elizabeth Daniels is an award-winning photographer based in her native Los Angeles. Her photographs have appeared in; The New York Times, Architectural Digest, Architects Newspaper, LA Times, and Elle magazine, just to name a few. She prefers to work alone, which allows her the opportunity to experience seminal architecture like the Farnsworth House, the Ennis House, and the Salk Institute with undivided, quiet, and intuitive attention. In this way, she can better understand the architect - and her lens can better capture - the details that make a structure special. Her approach to photography and her post production perfectionism have not missed the attention of AIA. Annually, over the past three years, Daniels’ work has won an AIA/APA award for its excellence.
Contract Address0x495f...7b5e
Token ID
Token StandardERC-1155
BlockchainEthereum
MetadataCentralized
Creator Fees10%
Event
Price
From
To
Date